Crater Lake Date


We spent the day at Crater Lake (the Lake) which is located about 75 miles southeast from LaPine State Park (where we’re staying). It’s one of those “bucket list” kind of places you need to see (like Niagara Falls or the Grand Canyon). It’s truly an awesome site. Since the snow in the region has been slow melting off, the north entrance of the park was closed; so we had to drive into the park from the south entrance. A little bit longer drive but hell, we’re retired; who cares how long it takes to get somewhere!

The Lake was formed after Mount Mazama erupted over 7,700 years ago.

Crater Lake

Before Mazama blew its top, the mountain was over 12,000 feet high. The eruption was so large it blew 18 cubic miles of earth into the atmosphere and vaporized nearly every living thing within a 30 mile radius! Now the Lake’s caldera is a little over 7,000 feet high. I always thought that Lake Superior was the deepest since it was so large; but that’s not the case here. Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States with a depth of 1,943 feet. Lake Superior…just a measly 1,333 feet deep.

Mount Mazama grew over 400,000 years by repeated eruptions that occurred in the Cascade mountain range which have active volcanos ranging from Northern California to British Columbia. 7 million years ago the Cascade range began to rise as the ocean crust collided with the Pacific continental crust. As the ocean crust encountered the continental crust, it was pushed down into the earth’s mantel where high temperature caused the rock to melt and be pushed up to the earth’s surface. As you can imagine this molten rock had to go somewhere and gradually overtime the Cascade volcano mountain range began to form after many eruptions.

When Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, we got to witness that cataclysmic event but on a very small scale. As noted above, it was nothing compared to the explosion of Mount Mazama. Archeologists have found evidence that early native Americans witnessed the eruption of Mount Mazama. Those people passed the event down through the ages among the tribes story tellers. I imagine many centuries (perhaps millennia) later, the natives were able to travel to this spot and see for themselves what their ancestors told them was true. It wasn’t until the Gold Rush of the 1840s that the Lake was discovered by a mining prospector who just happened to make the 7,000 foot climb up the mountain. The first picture of the lake wasn’t taken until 1873; and in 1886, an effort was made to study and preserve the Lake instead of exploiting it for commercial purposes. It finally became a national park in 1902.

Cloud Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s amazing standing on top of the rim and looking out at what was once a magnificent mountain. But what’s more amazing is how the Lake filled up after the mountain collapsed into its huge magma chamber since there are no rivers feeding in to and out of the Lake.

Wizard Island’s Volcanic Cone

 

 

 

 

 

 

The average snowfall at Crater Lake measures around 43 feet every season. That’s over 500 inches of snow every year! So after centuries of snow and rain (it is in the Pacific Northwest where there’s lots of liquid sunshine most of the time!) the basin of the mountain became full of clear and pristine water which is visible to a depth of 143 feet! The water is so clear that it absorbs the other colors of the spectrum; so when you look at the Lake, it is the truest blue color you’ll ever see! The Lake also maintains its water level by natural forces of precipitation, evaporation and seepage. Other facts about the Lake: It’s 6.02 miles across (at its maximum distance) and holds 4.9 trillion gallons of water. It has 16 hiking trails at the park ranging from easy to strenuous difficulty.  It’s also accessible from the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail if you happen to be hiking that 2,659 mile trail from Southern California to the U.S. – Canadian border.

On the Pacific Cost Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the rim road around the park is open, you can drive 33 miles around the park in about 2 or 3 hours stopping off at various scenic outlooks and picnic areas throughout the park.

We made it to the visitor’s center to watch the 22 minute video on how the lake was formed and how the Park Service currently protects and manages the Lake. I have to say the park employee that introduced the video could have done standup comedy before becoming a park ranger. He was very good with the audience. After the movie we drove to the Rim Village where we took in our first glimpse of the Lake. Then we drove as far as we could to Discovery Point. From there, we hiked about a mile up the road since no cars were allowed due to snow removal. We never expected to see this much snow by this time of the year.

Deep Snow on June 6, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After our hike, we took our folding chairs and picnicked at a spot on the rim just down from Discovery Point. We stayed at that spot about another hour before leaving with a new adventure under our belts.

Picnic Spot

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also leave knowing that although it may be a peaceful lake now, the mountain may awaken someday with a new eruptive phase as the geologic processes that built the Cascades Range continues.

Peace!

Good-Bye Salt Lake; Oregon Here We Come!


On our way to Oregon, we parked at Juniper Reservoir RV Park outside Lakeview, Oregon on June 1st.  The day before yesterday (May 30th) we left Salt Lake City (SLC) and traveled to Winnemucca, Nevada and stayed overnight.

We had a blast in SLC.

Mount Timpanogo

 

 

 

 

Campsite – Deer Creek Reservoir – Small House BIG Yard

 

 

 

 

 

 

The SLC area has changed so much since I lived there in 1975 on a NMSU work-study program with Kennecott Copper Corp. SLC was just a little bit bigger than Albuquerque back then then; but when the 2002 Olympics came to town, SLC took off like a rocket.  Now it’s one big metropolis from Orem to Ogden.

It was great attending Patrick’s wedding…

 

Pops and the Boys @ Kickball Picnic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick’s Wedding Venue

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wedding Vows w/the Right Reverand Anthony Manganaro Officiating

and afterwards getting together with our RV buddies–Mike and Connie and Dave and Cindy–that we met two years ago at the RV Dreams Rally in Michigan.

 

Golf Outing w/RV buddies Mike (R) & Dave (L)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Butte Botanical Gardens (SLC) w/RV friends Mike & Connie and Cindy & Dave

While we were in SLC, we did some hiking and sightseeing throughout the area.

 

Mormon Temple

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mormon Tabernacle

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart Falls Trailhead

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Herd on Antelope Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hiking @ Alta Ski Resort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Juniper Reservoir Park is situated on a 5,000 acre ranch about 6 miles north of Lakeview. It has a number of pull-thru spaces with nice views of the forest and mountains that surround the campground.

 

Campground at Juniper Reservoir RV Park

We mostly hung out and walked around. I also washed the front of the RV so it didn’t look so messy. We saw lots of pretty birds–large groups of pelicans–flying in and out of the park and on the water.

As we travel through Oregon, Pam and I can’t stop believing–is this a dream–how lucky we are to wander around like this! We have nothing to do but enjoy the beauty that surrounds us where ever we go. Believe me, life is good!

Peace

Readying Ourselves for our Next Adventure

Howdy from New Mexico!  Pam and I have been hanging out in Albuquerque since April 3rd visiting my family and Pam’s daughter, Jandi. My brother John’s daughter, Joanna, was married on April 28th at Los Poblanos Historic Inn and Organic Farm.  My sons, Patrick, Aaron, and Anthony, were also able to attend the service, so it was nice for all of my immediate family to be together (my parents, Ross and Anne, would be so proud!).  We had a blast having family all together and getting out to see some of the sites and exhibits while we were in the area.  We were also thankful for being able to eat some excellent Mexican food. (They just can’t make it better any place else but New Mexico!)

View of the Sandia Mountains from the Volcanos west of Albuquerque, NM

 

 

 

 

 

Selfie at the Tent Rocks National Monument

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tent Rocks National Monument

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick taking a break

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selfie – Patrick and Pops

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brother Ross’ Peacock in his backyard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joanna and Adrian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newly weds dancing to Mariachi Band

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My three sons(L-R) Patrick, Aaron & Anthony

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brothers Manganaro – Me, Ross & John

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick and his fiancé, Kiersten (Kiki)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Handsome Couple – Aaron and his girlfriend, Krystal Barnard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pam’s daughter, Jandi, and Anthony (W/an Uncle Subby Manganaro Photobombing!)
Selfie of the family at the wedding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John, Joanna and Julia’s Kareoke numba

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aaron’s Kareoke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony’s Kareoke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out for a stroll in Corrales

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meow Wolf Exhibit Building – Santa Fe, NM

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statue of the Iron Man at Meow Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Albuquerque we plan to return to Carlsbad to visit Pam’s son, Josh, and the granddaughters for about a week. Then we’re headed to Orem, Utah for Patrick’s wedding which will be held May 19th through the 21st.  After his wedding, we plan to travel to Oregon and Washington for the summer and fall. Thanks for tuning in and letting me share our continuing adventure.

Peace!

Carl

 

 

Time to get on the road again…

We’ve had a wonderful time in Texas visiting family and taking care of annual business (banking, doctor appts, mail, vehicle maintenance, etc.) and now it’s time roll again and we are ready. Being here for the past 3 months has allowed us to “be in the neighborhood” of several family members at different times hanging out and catching up. Both of my parents, my sister, my two brothers, and one of my children live here in Texas and it is fun to come be a part of their lives for a little while. I am very thankful for them and their families and the time we were able to share with them.

So now we begin heading west tomorrow. We will ultimately be doing a Northwest trip this year, but Big Bend National Park in TX is first on the list. We are meeting some friends in the Alpine/Marfa/Fort Davis area for a few days, then on to Terlinqua TX to see Big Bend. We always intended to make this trip from Carlsbad and never followed through, so now’s the time. Then we’ll make our way up to New Mexico for a while.

We get asked quite often about how long we hope to continue this lifestyle, and we both agree there is still way too much to see and do to think about ending any time soon. This journey has been way beyond our expectations and continues to excite and challenge us each day.

We appreciate your interest and taking time to keep up with us. We continue to hope your lives are filled with peace, joy, and love.

Pam (and Carl)

A Quick Update

Thought I’d better let everyone know we are still alive and well.  This is what we’ve been doing:

—Gettysburg.  We stayed at a Pine Grove Furnace State Park outside of Gettysburg and drove in to tour the museum and cyclorama on one day, then went back to do a driving tour through the battleground the next day.  It was truly amazing to see and hear about all the battles during those 3 days in 1863.  Learned so much more than I ever remember covering in school.

—Washington D.C.  We decided at the last minute to visit D.C. (at my dad’s suggestion, thanks Dad) and were so glad we did.  Cherry Hill RV Park (in MD) had a sightseeing session providing us with all the info we needed to see the sights.  We went into D.C. 3 days and tried to absorb all we could during our visit.  I have to say, especially during these difficult times in the USA, it was inspiring to be reminded of how our country began and to see and read so much of what it has taken to get to where we are today.  The museums were so very interesting, so much to try to take in.  But the memorials were absolutely stunning; wonderful tributes to extraordinary people.

—Claytor Lake State Park, Virginia.  We are parked here for a few days to get back to nature after being so busy sightseeing.  We took a nice walk around the park yesterday, then took the kayak out for a trip in the lake.  We drove along the Blue Ridge Parkway today, lovely scenery even though the colors are almost gone.  It is quiet and peaceful here, a nice break from the busy city.

Coming up next:

—Nashville TN.  We are headed that way and plan to stay several days in the area.  If any of you have suggestions on places to go, we’d love to hear them.

—We will be in Arkansas for Thanksgiving to visit our daughter and her family!

—Getting closer to TX to visit family and friends, take care of necessities and hopefully stay somewhat warm for the winter.

I have not included any pictures in this post until we resolve our issue, sorry:-(

We continue to hope you will find peace, love and joy in your lives each and every day!

Pam

Farewell to Vermont, Heading South Now

As you may or may not know, we left Branbury State Park in Vermont a few days ago where we’ve been campground volunteers since May.

Lake Dunmore and Branbury S.P. (Beach) from Rattlesnake Cliff lookout
Lake Dunmore and Branbury S.P. (Beach) from Rattlesnake Cliff lookout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loon on Sugarhill Reservoir
Loon on Sugarhill Reservoir

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We met and got to work with a great group of young people at the park and were able to visit often with Aaron (Carl’s son) and his girlfriend, Krystal, who live in Burlington.

 

Branbury S.P. Staff and Darcy
Branbury S.P. Staff and Darcy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun time w/Aaron and Krystal at Aaron's 30th B-day
Fun time w/Aaron and Krystal at Aaron’s 30th B-day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We got to take many hikes and see the beautiful fall colors of New England.

Fall foliage
Fall foliage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also visited Carl’s brother, John, and his wife, Jeanne, in Maine a couple of times.

 

Happy times w/John andJeanne in Maine
Happy times w/John andJeanne in Maine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that we’re finished workcamping for a while, we look forward to being able to explore our way down to Texas for the winter.  We can just take our time without being on any time schedule.  For now our plans are to stop over at Gettysburg and then visit our nation’s capital before it goes to hell in a handbasket on November 8th.  After that, we’ll head over to Kentucky and Tennessee and plan to spend Thanksgiving with Pam’s daughter, Brianne, and her family in Arkansas.  Then we’ll head to Texas and plan to stay there until after February.

Living as long as we did in Vermont we felt like we knew where to shop, eat and take shortcuts through the towns of Middlebury, Brandon and Burlington. The young people at the campground and the family that adopted Darcy were very friendly and made fond memories of the times we spent together.

 

Darcy at Lake Champlain
Darcy at Lake Champlain

 

 

 

 

 

 

The public library in Middlebury was also a great resource as we were able to use the facility for Internet service and DVD rentals.

As we say farewell to Vermont, we know that we will visit the New England area again in the future; but in leaving it behind, we get a strange feeling we’ll not only miss the people we met but we’ll miss the persons we were at that time and place because of the experiences we encountered and enjoyed.  As the saying goes, “To everything there is a season…” and we will continue to enjoy this ride/journey together until the wheels fall off!!!

 

Last view of Mt. Mooselamoo from the park
Last view of Mt. Mooselamoo from the park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lake Champlain w/the Adirondack mountains
Lake Champlain w/view of the Adirondack mountains

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunset on Lake Dunmore
Sunset on Lake Dunmore

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for your interest in our travels and peace, joy and love to you all!

Carl and Pam

 

Moosehead Lake Adventures

Pam and I visited my brother and sister-in-law, John and Jeanne, in Greenville, Maine. We stayed at a cottage on Moosehead Lake which is one of the largest fresh water lakes (outside the Great Lakes) in the U.S.

Sunset on Moosehead Lake - View from the cottage
Sunset on Moosehead Lake – View from the cottage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We explored several areas around Greenville one of which was the crash site of a Strategic Air Command (SAC) B-52 stratofortress which crashed on January 24, 1963.

Sign indicator of crash site
Sign indicator of crash site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The SAC bomber, which was based out of Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts, was on a routine low-level radar exercise when the vertical stabilizer failed attempting it’s fly over Elephant Mountain 6 miles northeast of Greenville. The bomber was not carrying any armaments or weapons at the time of the crash. 7 crew members perished and two survived in the crash. One of the survivors’ ejection seat parachute failed; but fortunately he landed upright in five feet of snow, fracturing his skull and three ribs. He and the other survivor suffered the night in -28 degree Fahrenheit before they were rescued the following day. One of the crew members was able to parachute from the plane but died when he hit a tree on his way down. The others on board didn’t have time to escape since it took 10 seconds for the plane to crash after its stabilizer failed. The wreckage at the site is a memorial to the crew members that died in the accident; therefore the public is asked not to disturb or collect any of the thousands of plane parts and debris that are scattered all over the mountain.

B-52 Crash Site - notice to visitors
B-52 Crash Site – notice to visitors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notice from forrest harvester and site maintainer
Notice from forrest harvester and site maintainer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even though after the crash, some of the locals carried off parts to their homes; many items have either been returned to the crash site or donated to the local museum. There are also reports of parts even found on the other side of the mountain. The hiking trail to the crash site is relatively easy, and is only about half a mile long. There are also smaller trails in the surrounding area that leads to more wreckage. The main part of the crash site is about 300 yards long and you can see parts hanging in the trees or wedged tightly in the ground. When I was researching this incident, I read that about a week after the crash, another SAC bomber from New Mexico crashed when it’s vertical stabilizer failed as well. These two incidents brought back memories of a Cub Scout field trip, when we were allowed to board the stratofortress and fueling planes stationed at the SAC’s base in Roswell, New Mexico.

Part of debri field
Part of debri field

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cockpit with memorial to crew members
Cockpit with memorial to crew members

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commemorative memorial to those crewmen of the crash
Commemorative memorial to those crewmen of the crash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part wedged in tree
Part wedged in tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scattered wreckage
Scattered wreckage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tire wheel and axle burned in crash
Tire wheel and axle burned in crash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big wheels
Big wheels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part wedged in tree
Part wedged in tree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landing gear with flags
Landing gear with flags

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fuselage
Fuselage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While we were at Moosehead Lake, we hired a fishing guide who took the four of us out on the Lake. We left the marina around 7:00 a.m. and cruised to an area the guide felt we’d have the best luck of catching fish. As mentioned above, Moosehead Lake is one of the largest lakes in the U.S. It’s surface area of 117 square miles has over 400 miles of shoreline.  In some places, the lake is about 250 feet deep.  Since there were five of us with fishing licenses, we were able to put 10 lines in the water. Our guide who was originally from Michigan and experienced at fishing in the Great Lakes, used gear that enabled us to fish in deep waters. He would attach our lures to the lines; then after he cast them out on the water, he attached the lines to outriggers with “cannon ball” weights which would sink our lures and lines to various depths (i.e. 50′, 80′, 100′, an so on). He also had a “fish finder” that indicated the depth of the lake, water temperature and trolling speed. We fished anywhere between 80 to 250 feet of water and trolled about 2.5 mph. The water was unusually warm–about 67 degrees Fahrenheit which makes the fish head for the cooler (deep) areas of the lake. I figured since the lake is so massive the fish would be all over the place and even further in the northern part of the lake, however our guide said that 85% of the fish in Moosehead Lake are in about 5% of the lake area. He also mentioned that the fish like to hang out near the schools of fish the Game and Fish stock the lake with. We hooked our first fish about an hour after we started and then caught six more before we headed back. It was beautiful fishing out on the lake. Lots of fabulous scenery after the morning fog burned off. As for the thrill of fishing on the lake, the guide would hook the fish and we would just reel them in so we felt like we were kids fishing off a dock with our parents for the very first time.

Pam reeling in the BIG one!
Pam reeling in the BIG one!

 

 

 

 

 

 

John's BIG salmon
John’s BIG salmon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pam's BIG catch!
Pam’s BIG catch!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our catch of the day!
Our catch of the day!

 

 

 

 

 

I landed the first fish–and won $3; while Pam had the bragging rights for catching the largest fish of the day–and won $15. After we came ashore, Pam and Jeanne went to the grocery store to buy fish dinner fixings while John and I met our guide at his business to learn how to filet the fish. We caught two salmon and four lake trout. It was a good memory for all and we learned a valuable lesson on catching fish in a deep water lake.

The day before we went fishing, we drove north of Greenville to see if we could spot a moose or two. We got to see Mount Kintahdin, the highest mountain (5,267 feet) in the northeast and is the beginning/ending of the 2,200 mile long Appalachian Trail. The “AT” as it’s called, runs through 14 states, north-south from Georgia to Maine.  The road, which eventually went from asphalt to dirt, took us through some scenic and rugged terrain. As we were coming across a one-lane bridge over a creek, we spotted a mother moose and her calf walking out of a shallow pond and into the woods. We quickly turned the truck around and headed back up the road a few feet to a clearing and waited. Sure enough the two creatures came out of the forrest and faced us about 30 feet from the truck. The mother kept herself hidden by the trees (although we could see her a little); but the calf was very curious and came out of the trees into our view. It was definitely a Kodak moment.

Moose calf
Moose calf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Moose calf
Moose calf

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then after a while, they backed out and wandered off out of sight. So was the extent of our moose expedition. We learned later (from our fishing guide) that the moose population is slowly dwindling due to ticks. These parasites are so thick that they weaken the moose herds to where they cannot thrive like they normally used to. It’s sad to think such beautiful animals might wither away to extinction and that nothing can be done to save them.

It was great exploring some beautiful areas of Maine with John and Jeannne and look forward to seeing them before they leave for New Mexico. They’re plan is to swing through Burlington, Vermont in mid October and meet with us,  Aaron and his girlfriend, Krystal. Until then we hope for the leaves to turn and see the real beauty of Fall in New England.

 

Fall colors in Vermont
Fall colors in Vermont
Brother selfie at crash site
Brother selfie at crash site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peace! Carl